Protestors Block Feds From Unloading Buses Full Of Illegal Immigrants

YouViewed/Editorial

Feds Booed In California City After Standoff On Illegals

” An overflow crowd in a Southern California community where protesters turned back Homeland Security busloads of immigrants gave a harsh reception to federal officials behind the decision to bring them to Murrieta in the first place.

  Local politicians calling for secure borders proved far more popular with the crowd Wednesday night.

” Send them back! Send the back!” the special-meeting crowd chanted, shouting down Chief Border Patrol Agent Paul Beeson after he took responsibility for transferring the Central American children and families to Murrieta from Texas, where the numbers are too much for facilities to handle.

  On Tuesday, the buses were rerouted an hour south to San Diego after they were met with flag-waving protesters in Murrieta.

  The Wednesday night crowd, gathered at a high school auditorium that seats 750 in the desert city of 100,000 people…

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The gun rights movement and its lunatic fringe

Phil Ebersole's Blog

I am not a gun person, but I don’t consider myself an enemy of  gun owners or gun rights advocates.

I’m philosophically in accord with much of what the gun rights movement says, while not in sympathy with some of its manifestations, including people in public places who carry around deadly weapons as if they were fashion accessories.

I believe that:

  • Self-protection is a fundamental human right.
  • The Constitution gives Americans an individual right to keep and bear arms.
  • Firearms have useful and legitimate purposes.
  • Ownership of firearms by responsible, law-abiding people is not a social problem.
  • Down through history and across many cultures, denial of the right to own weapons is a defining mark of a subjugated people.  (The other is denial of the right to testify in court).
  • Guns are an icon of American culture, just as swords are an icon of Japanese culture.

A lot…

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The multiverse as a scientific concept — part I

Scientia Salon

looking-for-life-in-the-multiverse_1by Coel Hellier

The multiverse concept is often derided as “unscientific” and an example of physicists indulging in metaphysical speculation of the sort they would usually deplore. For example, commenters here at Scientia Salon have said that the multiverse is “by definition not verifiable and thus outside the bounds of empirical science,’’ and that “advocates of multiverses seem to be in need of serious philosophical help” [1].

Critics thus claim that the multiverse amounts to a leap of faith akin to a religious belief. Indeed, the religious often accuse atheistic scientists of inventing the multiverse purely to rebut the “fine-tuning” argument that they say points to a creator god, though the fine-tuning argument is readily refuted in several other ways, and anyhow physicists really don’t care enough about theology these days to let that worry them; further, the concepts leading to a multiverse were developed well before theologians started taking…

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Among the Sleep: Review

Aside

Originally posted on Polygon:

“Among the Sleep seeks to answer a question that I imagine is pretty common for parents. I have a nine-month-old child myself, and when he wakes up in the middle of the night sobbing and shaken, I cannot help but wonder what it is that could be torturing the dreams of someone so young…”

Click here for the full review.

There is no Golden Age

riversandstone

“What the Founding Fathers actually meant was…”

“Well, if you really read into the Bible, you’ll see that Jesus meant…”

“We’re not meant to eat wheat.  If you knew what our paleo ancestors used to eat…”

We hear remarks like these all the time, in casual conversation on politics, religion, history, to the point of cliché.   They all share a common theme: to put it simply, things aren’t going as well today as they were yesterday, so if we simply figure out what people were doing yesterday, we can get better!

When I used to teach, I would occasionally drive home three “rules” of history.

1.  There is no Virgin Land

2.  There are no Indigenous Peoples

3.  There is no Golden Age

I’m going to focus here on the final of the three rules (the other two I may get to later).  The quotes I opened with were fixations…

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Ayahuasca (part 2 of 2)

Aidan J. Reid

This is a continuation of the original post which can be found here.


The Shamanic lodge was located in the middle of a forest about 45 minutes drive from the city of Cusco. That Saturday, after the Group readings, my buddy and I explored our surroundings. It was a beautiful location, hemmed in on all sides by pine trees and a little rocky river that flowed near the house. After spending a couple of hours basking in the sunshine, we returned to the lodge where we filled the empty hours with sleep and reading books.

The next ritual was a second, and final dose of ayahuasca which was at 8pm. It would be the same process as the one the night before except my friend would swap places with me, placing him beside the Shaman (he had been distracted by the movements of the staff in the twilight of…

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An academic crash course on Ayahausca

 

Originally posted by: Benton Rooks on Reality Sandwich

20 Essential Books on The Mysterious Power of Ayahausca

“Despite the recent surge in mainstream popularity of the vine (due primarily to celebrity culture, Elle, Oprah, and National Geographic) the subtle occult, paranormal, and metaphysical aspects of ayahuasca—for those who have dedicated their entire life to understanding and working with it—are still very much in need of further exploration….”

 

“By any means necessary”

Hanesydd Cymraeg

MalcolmX

Discuss the phrase ‘by any means necessary’ in the philosophy of Malcolm X

Malcolm X is one of the most contentious figures of the twentieth century and has caused debate among scholars, journalists and followers with his views on Black Nationalism and Black Power. He is a divisive figure having many critics who accuse him of being inflammatory and an advocate of the use of violence, and many supporters who see him as a champion of black civil rights who stood up to the white power structure of America. His oratory skills were remarkable, and his use of purposefully ambiguous language allowed the mainly black audiences to take what they wanted from his speeches. His principles and beliefs can at times seem contradictory, but over the last three years of his life, his political views change from that of a militant, radical revolutionary to a more gradual but still controversial…

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