The gun rights movement and its lunatic fringe

Phil Ebersole's Blog

I am not a gun person, but I don’t consider myself an enemy of  gun owners or gun rights advocates.

I’m philosophically in accord with much of what the gun rights movement says, while not in sympathy with some of its manifestations, including people in public places who carry around deadly weapons as if they were fashion accessories.

I believe that:

  • Self-protection is a fundamental human right.
  • The Constitution gives Americans an individual right to keep and bear arms.
  • Firearms have useful and legitimate purposes.
  • Ownership of firearms by responsible, law-abiding people is not a social problem.
  • Down through history and across many cultures, denial of the right to own weapons is a defining mark of a subjugated people.  (The other is denial of the right to testify in court).
  • Guns are an icon of American culture, just as swords are an icon of Japanese culture.

A lot…

View original post 481 more words

Advertisements

Michigan Loses ‘Right To Farm’ This Week: A Farewell To Backyard Chickens and Beekeepers

Taking Back America

From The Inquisitr
By Dawn Papple | 2 May 2014

Michigan backyard chicken farmers lost their Right To Farm protection under the new GAAMP changes.

Michigan residents lost their “right to farm” this week thanks to a new ruling by the Michigan Commission of Agriculture and Rural Development. Gail Philburn of the Michigan Sierra Club told Michigan Live, the new changes “effectively remove Right to Farm Act protection for many urban and suburban backyard farmers raising small numbers of animals.” Backyard and urban farming were previously protected by Michigan’s Right to Farm Act. The Commission ruled that the Right to Farm Act protections no longer apply to many homeowners who keep small numbers of livestock.

View original post 598 more words

The Crucifixion of White People…

serhasacomplaint

Crucifixion, which was how the carpenter reportedly martyred himself, “is a form of slow and painful execution in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead.”

It is also apparently what happens when someone receives any consequences for their racist actions.

First Paula Deen. Then Phil Robertson. And now poor, philandering racist Donald Sterling.

The usual argument is that racism is obviously bad, but perhaps more like wearing white after Labor Day bad and not something worse punishing anyone for so severely or, well, at all. And the first amendment grants all Americans the right to say odious things and suffer no economic repercussions, right? Even if that’s not at all how a capitalist economic system works. I thought Americans loved their capitalism? And unfettered capitalism is colder than the Oregon Coast in February.

Mike Pesca at…

View original post 388 more words

Coming back around again: The resegregation of schools in the American South

Whether the conversation focuses on positive gains or negative impacts, race is a constant hot-button issue in America. Some believe that we’ve entered a period of “post-racial” awareness. Put simply, a lot of folks want to believe that structural/systemic racism is no longer an inhibitor to success in the States. Those uber-optimists may be right, to some extent, but as a recent article in the Atlantic finds, we’ve still got quite a journey, particularly in terms of equal education.

Click link for more:

Resegregation in the American South

FBI to add 52 million photos to NGI database

After suing the FBI ( and winning!) the folks over at Electronic Frontier Foundation have learned that the government agency plans to have around 52 million photos in its NGI database by 2015. One of the more significant details is the inclusion of non-criminal photos in this datasweep; FBI also says it plans to have at least 4.3 million non-criminal photos by 2015.

Click the link for more:

FBI Plans to Have 52 Million Photos in its NGI Face Recognition Database by Next Year

Map: Detroit’s Sympathetic and Unsympathetic Ethnic Groups 1960

DETROITography

sympathetic-ethnic-groups

The city was fairly diverse in the 1960s, yet there were underlying tensions between different ethnic groups and their particular sympathies towards Detroit’s black population. In this map the Detroit Geographic and Expedition Institute (DGEI) mapped out those various relationships based on Census data.

View original post